How To: Tow an Iceberg Part 3

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So in the previous article we discovered how eddies in certain conditions can be used with great benefit by the iceberg convoy.

Today, we’ll keep on looking at the technical issue of towing an iceberg, but from a general perspective, that is at the scale of the global trip across the Atlantic Ocean:

  • How many tugs are needed?
  • How powerful do they need to be?
  • How much fuel will they consume?

Will the biggest bollard-pull prove to be the most efficient in economical and ecological terms? Naturally, you might expect that the bigger bollard-pull, the quicker you reach the destination point.

In the case of transporting an iceberg, things are not that simple.

The critical success factor is actually to be able to find the perfect ratio in-between the convoy speed and the relative melt of the iceberg and fuel consumption. Only as such will you be able to minimize the energy spent and reduce the carbon footprint.

The power of simulation allows you to repeat the experience as much as you like, by changing whatever relevant parameter: this is what we did regarding the bollard-pull.

I won’t hold you longer. The simulation results are quite surprising: one tug with 130 ton traction would be sufficient to tow a 7 million ton tabular iceberg – the equivalent of a nutshell next to the ice mountain.

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experiential

How is that possible?

Well, above all, the idea is to harness the power of the prevailing currents to transport the iceberg “with no actual [towing] effort”. Please refer to the previous article for an explanation of the principle of assisted drifting.

The only cases where you need to use several tugs (two or three, it varies) are the ones where you need to be able to maneuver with great accuracy and where prevailing currents are not necessary here for you, in other words, the departure and arrival phases of the transportation operation.

Fascinating right? Please feel free to leave a message if you have any questions! 🙂

Best,

Cédric

georges, mougin, drifting, model, tow, iceberg, tug, newfoundland, canada, canary, islands, solidworks, catia, delmia, 3dvia, enovia, simulia, draftsight, exalead, intercim, system, systemes, dassault systèmes, dassault, 3DS, DS, PLM, PLM 2.0, PDM, CAD, simulation, digital, manufacturing, design, engineering, innovation, experience, sea, experientialCédric Simard is Project Director at Dassault Systèmes.

Cedric

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