Design for life: Spotlight on Arthur Mamou-Mani

Architect Arthur Mamou-Mani founded an architectural practice specializing in digital design, fabricated architecture, custom products, and interfaces. They design, make and create, forging a holistic approach to the design process. Well respected in his field, he is a fellow of the Royal Society for Encouragement of the Arts Manufacture and Commerce,  and has recently been awarded the prestigious Pierre Cardin Prize for Architecture from the Academie des Beaux-Arts in France.

Design for life and Dassault Systèmes’ Design Studio

Mamou-Mani is featured in Design for life, a collaboration between Dezeen magazine and Dassault Systèmes. The in-house Design Studio founded by Anne Asensio at Dassault Systèmes develops close relationships with designers, creators and innovators from across the design community who explore and experiment with advanced technologies to develop new collaborative design processes to build a better world.

The ambition of Mamou-Mani Associates is to create sustainable designs that help our planet, and trigger curiosity and awe. They look to innovate continuously – with new processes, technologies and biomaterials that revolutionize the ecosystem.

 

Exploring lifecycles of 3D-printable materials

Mamou-Mani has been working with Dassault Systèmes in a sustainability-focused collaboration that looks at sustainable manufacturing of different 3D-printable materials and how printed structures can be recycled or repurposed.

 

Cradle-to-cradle materials use

By 3D-printing structures, architects could reduce the impact on the environment, according to Mamou-Mani, by reducing waste and the need to transport structures to building sites. The structures would be manufactured and ready for installation on the job site.

 

Using bioplastic material to 3D-print plastic modules

In the collaboration with Dassault Systèmes, he is investigating “cradle-to-cradle” architecture. Mamou-Mani starts with pellets of bioplastic materials that are used to 3D-print plastic modules. After use, the modules are crushed and the material is returned to its original pellet state. The recycled pellets can then be used to make new 3D-printed modules.

“From 3D printing to crushing to composting, we wanted to show all the states of the material, showing what is ultimately a renewable, cradle-to-cradle and sustainable lifecycle.”

– Arthur Mamou-Mani

Bioplastic material is used to 3D-print plastic modules

 

Watch an interview with Arthur Mamou-Mani as he describes his design approaches and presents some of his projects.

Other cutting-edge architects and designers using technology and research who are profiled in the Design for Life series include the founder of JK Design Julia Koerner, Exploration Architecture founder Michael Pawlyn, Studio INI founder Nassia Inglessis and DS Automobiles design director Thierry Métroz.

You can also watch the complete series of designer interviews on the Design for Life portal.

Maryann Dennehy

Maryann Dennehy

Maryann is a Senior Communications Manager on the Dassault Systèmes corporate publishing team. She’s been with the company for over 13 years, in roles ranging from marketing communications, creative and branding manager to marketing programs manager. Twitter: @3DMTL