3D Won’t Replace Traditional Fashion Design (It Will Make it Better)

dressmaking still life - pink measure tape, pins, thimble, shears on fabrics

There’s something about fashion apparel that inspires people. It is, perhaps, the oldest craft, art form, and profession in the world, evolving from the simple utility of animal skins to the modern, purpose-built, tech apparel of today. People are passionate about their clothes: the fit, the color, the style, and the way it compliments their form. And why not? There are so many aspects to enjoy about apparel. There is the coziness of fleece or the comfort of a tee-shirt. Fabrics that, because of the thread construction, shimmer like fluttering fall leaves. There is the bliss of finding those pants with the perfect fit that seem to effortlessly compliment the human form.

Apparel is a fundamentally physical experience, so how can we hope to improve the experience with the cold preciseness of digital technology?

black-and-white-modelHumans tend to be binary in nature: plus or minus, black or white, either/or. The reality is that there is so little in life that is totally clear cut. The truth is generally found all along the line between the extremes, and so it is with physical and digital fashion design. Fashion design is, and always will be, about how a physical garment looks and feels on the body. But the fact remains that there are certain things that are either difficult, or impossible, to do in the real world. Many of these things, however, can be extremely easy to accomplish in the digital domain.

For instance, when creating a physical garment, there is no way to instantly change its color, material, or shape. Further, it takes a massive amount of effort to rearrange a physical retail space in order to try different assortments, layouts, and fixtures. However, making these types of changes are nearly instantaneous in the digital world. And although the digital realm is very good about showing options and allowing you to make changes, it can tell you very little about how a garment feels and nothing about the quality of its construction. And it’s because of this last flaw in digital tools that many in the fashion world often throw these tools out completely.

Learn more about 3D in Consumer Goods, Fashion and Retail:

Lauriane

Lauriane

Lauriane is currently Marketing Director for the Consumer Goods & Retail Industry at Dassault Systèmes. She took over this role in 2016, after ten years of work experience at Dassault Systèmes in various Marketing and Communication positions. Prior to this role, she spent four years in charge of the Communication for the FashionLab by Dassault Systèmes, the company’s technology incubator dedicated to the fashion industry. She holds a Master in Management with a special emphasis on Marketing. Passionate about fashion, digital technology and sustainable innovation, she creates and delivers inspirational content for various communication channels. She is also in charge of developing strong relationships within the consumer goods and retail ecosystem.